…and Graffiti Nights (Part 2)

Along with all of the art in museums and other spaces where the works match the more classical definition of art, Spain is also decorated with a TON of street art. I really like art of any style or media, and I think street art can be a beautiful and powerful form of expression. I always take notice of the graffiti in any city I go to, and it was omnipresent in Spain. Every city I visited was covered with tagging and graffiti. In Alcalá de Henares, where I stayed, I actually got to see the process by which tagging is done, covered up, and redone. Along my route to class there were wide stretches of white walls that were the perfect canvas for the area’s taggers. In the morning I would pass city workers coating the walls in white paint, erasing strings of letters and names. Then later, on my way back from hanging out with friends at the bar or after taking the last train home from Madrid at night I would see groups of taggers out covering the newly white wall with vivid colors. It was a cycle that I watched over and over throughout my month there, with ceaseless working on both sides to have the last splash of paint. Here is a little bit of the graffiti in Alcalá that I actually watched being painted at night (red/orange tag and green/blue tag):

I didn’t see any truly “artistic” or impressive graffiti until my weekend in Valencia. The street art there is absolutely stunning, and I think it’s so awesome that the city’s culture supports this kind of expression. It’s not trashy looking or just simple tagging, but really adds another dimension to the buildings and the streets. I have way too many pictures to fit in this post, but here is a taste of what I saw:

Barcelona also had some very interesting and beautiful art. They actually have a few designated spaces in the city for graffiti, one of which being the Jardins de les Tres Xemeneies (Garden of the Three Chimneys). It is an urban park dominated by large walls where artists can paint without fear of being fined. I happened on it one day as I was walking back from the beach and the blend of styles and themes that I saw was stunning. I actually read online that the murals in the park are painted over once a week, so it seems as though my pictures are the only remnants of the art that was present on the day that I wandered by. The idea of the ever-changing landscape is both freeing and frustrating to me. Frustration from the quality of works these artists produce only to have them covered a few days later, but freedom in that there is a new experience for every visit to the park with new artists and new works to admire.

The culture in Spain is so deeply rooted and complex that one could spend a lifetime there and never discover it all. And the wide range of art in Spain, whether it be in the museums and the cathedrals or on the buildings and in the streets, just opens another window for people to see the culture and the beauty of the country. The richness and diversity of each of the cities I visited made it easy for me to see how so many artists find inspiration in Spain.

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